Phyllis J. Randall, David F. Snyder and Cathy McGhee column: Using technology to assess demand on Va.’s infrastructure after COVID-19 | Columnists


Phyllis J. Randall, David F. Snyder and Cathy McGhee column: Using technology to assess demand on Va.'s infrastructure after COVID-19 | Columnists







A Chevrolet Volt hybrid car charged at a parking garage in Los Angeles in 2018.




By Phyllis J. Randall, David F. Snyder and Cathy McGhee

While the pandemic has presented challenges over the past year, technology allowed us to connect with family, friends, colleagues and businesses from afar, and offered the ability to work from home and keep critical government services operating.

Yet, despite all the benefits of technology, eyebrows tend to raise when the idea of meshing technology with transportation is discussed.

But, like it or not, technology already is disrupting our lives. So, let’s embrace it. In fact, during his recent trip just outside of Detroit, President Joe Biden called for the United States to become the world leader in electric vehicle production as part of his $174 billion electric-vehicle proposal.

Just last month, the CEO and co-founder of Virgin Hyperloop, Josh Giegel, spoke to the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee about emerging mass transportation technology as an investment in a cleaner and more efficient system.

Some of us in the public sector also are exploring transportation innovation to position Northern Virginia for the months and decades ahead, while aiming for a more equitable, sustainable and safe future — criteria that can be used as a guide for considering clean mobility and transportation technology solutions.


Source link