Epilepsy death prompts gift of technology


Epilepsy death prompts gift of technology

An Elkhorn, Nebraska family is channeling their loss and grief into something hopeful for families who have a loved one with an epilepsy diagnosis.Erin Hurt was just 11 years old when she had a fatal seizure in her home as she prepared for school in April. Her twin sister called 911, as her mother performed CPR.“Some days it’s hard to get up and get going. It even hurts to breathe sometimes,” said Allison Hurt, Erin’s mom. Diagnosed as an infant, each time Erin had a fever, she would also have seizures. The seizures stopped for several years, and then returned last year, more violently than before. Allison said a neurologist put Erin on strong medications. She wishes there would have been more support, education and information about what the family might face in dealing with epilepsy. Erin loved to dance and sing. Her mom said she also enjoyed taking care of other children. Erin’s family is now using Erin’s memorial money from her funeral to purchase high tech devices for other families so they can closely monitor a child with epilepsy. Allison Hurt purchased 20 Embrace 2 devices made by the company, Empatica. It’s like a smart watch that will send a notification to the phone of a loved one if the wearer is having a certain type of seizure. This new technology rolled out in 2018. It also allows users to track their seizures in a digital log. “If it can impact one person’s life, one child’s life, then maybe something good can come out of this tragedy,” said Allison. Allison thinks a device like this could have saved Erin’s life, getting her aid more quickly. The devices can’t predict or stop seizures. The Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation and the Danny Did Foundation are offering the devices. The Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation is also raising money and purchasing 20 more devices to give away, in memory of Erin. The foundation said one in 26 people will be affected by epilepsy in their lifetime. “Here’s an opportunity for you to get a device free of charge that could save somebody’s life,” said Rose Opbroek, with the Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation. Those applying for a watch must have a doctor’s prescription. Families will be responsible for the monthly monitoring fee.To learn more, go to https://www.epilepsy.com/local/nebraska or email the Danny Did Foundation, Mduffy@dannydid.org.

An Elkhorn, Nebraska family is channeling their loss and grief into something hopeful for families who have a loved one with an epilepsy diagnosis.

Erin Hurt was just 11 years old when she had a fatal seizure in her home as she prepared for school in April. Her twin sister called 911, as her mother performed CPR.

Erin was 11 years old. She leaves behind a twin sister, Hailey.

“Some days it’s hard to get up and get going. It even hurts to breathe sometimes,” said Allison Hurt, Erin’s mom.

KETV-TV

Allison Hurt is educating others about epilepsy after her daughter died from a seizure. 

Diagnosed as an infant, each time Erin had a fever, she would also have seizures. The seizures stopped for several years, and then returned last year, more violently than before. Allison said a neurologist put Erin on strong medications. She wishes there would have been more support, education and information about what the family might face in dealing with epilepsy.

Erin loved to dance and sing. Her mom said she also enjoyed taking care of other children.

Erin’s family is now using Erin’s memorial money from her funeral to purchase high tech devices for other families so they can closely monitor a child with epilepsy. Allison Hurt purchased 20 Embrace 2 devices made by the company, Empatica. It’s like a smart watch that will send a notification to the phone of a loved one if the wearer is having a certain type of seizure. This new technology rolled out in 2018. It also allows users to track their seizures in a digital log.

KETV-TV

The Embrace 2 device will notify a relative if a the wearer has certain types of seizures. 

“If it can impact one person’s life, one child’s life, then maybe something good can come out of this tragedy,” said Allison.

Allison thinks a device like this could have saved Erin’s life, getting her aid more quickly. The devices can’t predict or stop seizures.

The Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation and the Danny Did Foundation are offering the devices. The Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation is also raising money and purchasing 20 more devices to give away, in memory of Erin. The foundation said one in 26 people will be affected by epilepsy in their lifetime.

“Here’s an opportunity for you to get a device free of charge that could save somebody’s life,” said Rose Opbroek, with the Nebraska Epilepsy Foundation.

Those applying for a watch must have a doctor’s prescription. Families will be responsible for the monthly monitoring fee.

To learn more, go to https://www.epilepsy.com/local/nebraska or email the Danny Did Foundation, Mduffy@dannydid.org.


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