16 institutes of technology and polytechnics being replaced by one mega polytech


16 institutes of technology and polytechnics being replaced by one mega polytech

Vocational education and training is now set for the biggest shake up in 25 years, with the country’s institutes of technology and polytechnics being replaced by one mega polytech.

On Thursday, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced seven key changes that he said would give the industry greater control over all aspects of vocational education and training, making the system more responsive to employers’ needs and to the changing world of work.

About 2904 submissions were made after Hipkins rolled out consultation on proposals in February.

New Zealand’s 16 institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) will now be brought together to operate as a single national campus network.

Education Minister Chris Hipkins has announced sweeping reforms for the tertiary sector.

ROSA WOODS/STUFF

Education Minister Chris Hipkins has announced sweeping reforms for the tertiary sector.

The new Institute will start on April 1, 2020, and will provide on-the-job and off-the-job learning. The head office will not be in Auckland or Wellington, and a charter will be set out in law.

No decisions had been made on how the system would be funded, which was yet to be designed. 

When asked about the cost of reform, Hipkins said $200 million had been set aside for contingency, but would not say if that included funds to bail out institutions.

Detailed work would start during the transition process and would likely take a few years, Hipkins said.

In the meantime, the Government will help meet cash flow problems and will cover the cost of transition.

INDUSTRY COUNCILS TO LEAD

About four to seven industry-governed Workforce Development Councils will be created by 2022 and will replace and expand most of the existing roles of industry training organisations.

New regional skills leadership groups will represent regional interests and will work across education, immigration and welfare systems in each region to identify local skill needs and make sure the system is delivering the right mix of education and training to meet them, he said.

Centres of Vocational Excellence (CoVEs) will be established at regional campuses to drive innovation and expertise, and improve linkages between education, industry and research.

Māori will be included as key partners, including through Te Taumata Aronui, a Māori Crown Tertiary Education Group – that will work with education agencies and Ministers and cover all aspects of tertiary education.

During the next two to three years, the role of supporting workplace learning will shift from industry training organisations to training providers.

DUAL FUNDING

The dual funding system will be unified and simplified to encourage greater integration of on-the-job and off-the-job learning, ensure learners can access more work-relevant and tailored support, and enable new models of education delivery which are more responsive to employer and industry demand.

Implementation of the changes would not be rushed, he said. To ensure continuity for learners and employers and to allow time to build new capacity, the transition will take three to four years to get fully underway.

“Learners should enrol in the education provider of their choice as they normally would in 2019 and 2020, including in multi-year programmes, and I encourage people in the workplace to keep training and employers to encourage more workers to sign up.”

The Southern Institute of Technology is one of the education providers who will be folded into the mega polytech under the Government's plan.

JOHN HAWKINS/ STUFF

The Southern Institute of Technology is one of the education providers who will be folded into the mega polytech under the Government’s plan.

ADDRESSING SKILL SHORTAGES

The changes were tackling the long-term challenges of skills shortages and the mismatch between training provided and the needs of employers, by comprehensively reforming vocational education, Hipkins said.

“Industry and employers will identify skills needs, set standards and approve qualifications and credentials, and influence funding decisions.”

Reform would also ensure that trades and vocational education were recognised and valued, he said.

“We want to see more work place learning, more apprentices and more opportunities for people to earn while they learn.”

“Vocational education, trades training and on-the-job training have been allowed to drift for too long. These are long-term challenges that this government is committed to fixing.

“The comprehensive changes we are making will address the widespread skills shortages across most industry sectors. These shortages highlight the limitations of the current vocational educational system.”


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